COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

All General Education courses have a credit value of four (8) each, except for the two compulsory courses: Sports & Physical Education and Creative Arts that have a zero (0) credit value each. These two courses, which have no credit value, must be validated as they are one of the requirements for graduation. Therefore, they will be given either a passed or failed mark in the transcript of the student. This means that out of the 14 general courses, 12 have a total of 48 credits.

GEN 110: Introduction to College Writing

The main purpose of this course is to introduce students to the conventions of academic writing and critical thinking. Students are introduced to college/university-level writing, including multiple rhetorical contexts for essay development. Emphasis on thesis development, essay organization, argumentation, critical reading and clarity of expression and introduction to incorporating source material using the APA style.

GEN 120: Sports & Creative Arts

This is a unique course designed to encourage physical fitness and creativity in students. The course is divided into two parts, the first dealing with sports and the second with creative arts. In sports, students work individually and cooperatively in various theoretical and practical aspects of sports. It provides students of varying abilities with experiences that facilitate physical, social, intellectual, cultural, spiritual and emotional growth. Meanwhile, creative arts addresses the art-forms of visual arts, creative writing, music, drama and dance.

GEN 130: Introduction to French

This course is designed for students with very little or no prior knowledge of French. The course provides a lively introduction to basic oral expression, listening comprehension, and elementary reading and writing. The audio-lingual approach, using practical vocabulary drawn from realistic situations aimed at good pronunciation and ease in response.

GEN 140: College Algebra

This course is a functional approach to algebra that incorporates the use of appropriate technology. Emphasis will be placed on the study of functions, and their graphs, inequalities, and linear, quadratic, piece-wise defined, rational, polynomial, exponential, and logarithmic functions. A graphical approach will be utilized throughout, with an emphasis on solving application problems.

GEN 150: Introduction to Science & Technology

The course aims at demystifying scientific concepts, exposing the latest developments in science and technology, and making the subject more interesting and understanding to students. It begins by defining science and technology, and their various sub-fields, and covers a relatively new academic field that has at its core the relationship between scientific knowledge, technological systems, and society. It reflects the latest advances in the field while continuing to provide students with a road map to the complex interdisciplinary terrain of science and technology studies. Students will be engaged in topics such as environmental concerns, evolution, vaccinations, GMOs, 3-D printing, human genome project, stem cell research, drug development, GPS, robotics, renewable energy, informatics and other
advances in science and technology.

GEN 210: Foundations of Philosophy & Religion

The course introduces students to philosophy and religion. In philosophy, students will begin by defining philosophy and understanding its main branches, but will focus mainly on logic, proof and critical thinking. Topics such as the nature of arguments, deduction and induction, syllogistic logic, propositional logic, quantified predicate logic, fallacious reasoning, scientific and critical reasoning will be studied. Ethics, approached from the perspective of moral philosophy and moral theology, will also be studied with a focus on the ethics of duty, idealism, utilitarianism, virtue, relativism, pragmatism, pluralism, critical ethics, ethics of care, and ethics of professionalism. Students will learn the
relevance of ethics in addressing current challenges such as terrorism, gender, equality, diversity, cultural recognition, competition, dishonesty, privacy, discrimination, reward and punishment. Finally, the course treats religion, covering such topics as comparative study of major religions, science and religion, liberation theology, religious enculturation, fundamentals of Catholicism, and the Church’s Social Teachings.

GEN 220: US Government, Politics & Global Issues

This course examines the three broad areas of studies – US government, political science, and global issues. It begins with an introduction to the concept of politics, examining it from the perspectives of philosophy and social sciences. It then focuses on democracy, especially from the US perspective, evaluating it through analyses of the major institutions, processes and government policies. Power, inequality, political culture, social movements, the Constitution, elections, the role of the media, and the parts played by the President, the bureaucracy, the Congress and the courts are all considered. In global issues, the course treats contemporary global issues including global trade, terrorism, global warming, regional integration, international supranational organizations, nationalist movements etc. Finally, it will focus of political systems in selected developing countries, comparing and contrasting them with the US system.

GEN 230: Introduction to Computer Information Systems

This course introduces students to the basic concepts and developments in information systems. Areas of study include computer technology, information system concepts, information systems development, and the use of technology in organizations. Also included is the general nature of computer hardware, software and systems: Hands-on applications include introduction to word processing, spreadsheet, database management, and presentation software, cloud computing, web browsing and e-mail.

GEN 240: English Grammar & Composition

This course emphasizes the study of grammar and composition. It introduces and explores word origins and various parts of speech to prepare students for critical reading and writing. This course also introduces students to practical applications for writing, such as business letters and memos. Equally, the course provides an analytical overview of grammar, punctuation, and sentence structure to help students improve writing skills, including writing efficiently and effectively. This course also introduces students to practical applications for writing, such as cover letters and resumes. It guides students through the steps for writing essays, from prewriting to final draft, and discusses various types of essays.

GEN 250: Introduction to Social Sciences

Knowledge and understanding of the social sciences place students in position to understand themselves as citizens within an integrated global society. The purpose of this course is to provide students with information about the principal social science disciplines and the relationships among them. Among the integrated social science disciplines are sociology, anthropology, archeology, psychology, political science, economics and geography. Preparation in the skills of social science inquiry prepares the student to engage in rational decision-making as both an individual and as a citizen.

GEN 410: Business & Entrepreneurship Project

The purpose of this course is to help students to develop the cognitive skills they need to understand the principles and mechanics that regulate everyday business life, to prepare them to deal effectively with the challenges of contemporary life, including issues in the business-society relationship, its history, world events, economic issues, and future expectations. It also examines the factors that lead towards entrepreneurial success, and the skills and behaviors necessary to be a successful entrepreneur. The course will cover design, creativity and entrepreneurship, the characteristics of and types of entrepreneurs, pathways to entrepreneurs and requirements for success. At the end of the course, the student will be expected to develop a business plan on a business idea in the student’s area of
studies.

GEN 420: Fundamentals to Research Methods & Statistical Analysis

This course is designed to provide foundation knowledge of research methods commonly used. The course will prepare the student to understand material and issues associated with but not limited to the logic of the scientific method, research designs, as well as the use of statistical packages for descriptive and inferential statistics. This course will cover research processes employing quantitative and qualitative methods. Topics include ethical considerations, observational and survey research techniques, graphing, central tendency and variability, correlation and linear regression, hypothesis testing etc. Students participate in data collection, data analysis and interpretation
by means of the microcomputer Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) and in the writing of APA-style research reports.

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Computer and Electrical Engineering

CEE 310: Circuit Theory
This course will enable the student use basic laws and theorems to analyze and make synthesis of the components in an AC and DC circuit. It will also enable them to use methods and tools required to analyze, modelise and make synthesis of the behaviour of components found in electrotechnics system. They will be able to use the basic principles involved in three phase system. To understand the domain of analyses of RC, RL, RLC circuit with dc and ad source. The course also examines issues relating to Transients, Filters. Two port networks: characteristics and modeling of impedance, admittance, hybrid parameters and transmission network.

CEE 320: Digital Logic and Computer Structures
Binary number system and arithmetic, computer codes, Boolean algebra, logic gates, K-map minimization, sequential circuits, memory devices, state diagram and table, computer architecture, memory, Arithmetic Logic Unit, and control unit

CEE 325: Electric Design and Drafting I
To demonstrate the understanding to design and draft different electrical installations and distribution networks. The course considers topics such as Basic Notion on Drafting procedures, Consumer distribution, Consumer’s Circuit, Selection of Cable and Feeder, Circuit Protection, Control Devices, Wiring Systems, Electrical Lamps and Illumination.

CEE 330: Electrical Design and Drafting II
The course enables students to demonstrate the understanding to design and draft electrical and communication systems, control circuit in building and assess external power requirement.

CEE 410: Microprocessors and Microcontrollers
This course will enable the student to understand and demonstrate knowledge of microprocessor fundamentals, followed by application-revelant information such as ; salient feature, internal architecture, instruction set, pin configuration, and popular bits brand. Enable student understand and demonstrate knowledge of fundamentals and application related aspects, with particular reference to its comparison with a microprocessor, the general internal architecture, pin configuration, the different families and popular bits brands.

CEE 415: Electrical Machines
This course is divided into three parts. Firstly, to study the fundamental principles of electrical machines and the characteristics of transformers and dc machines. On completion of this part, the student should be able possess an introduction to machine Principles, Transformers, Analysis of real transformer, the auto Transformer, DC Generators. Secondly, to study the fundamental principles of ac machines, the characteristics and the performance of induction motors. On completion of this part, the student should be able to: Study the fundamental Principles of machines. Study the theory, operation and characteristics of induction motor. Thirdly. to demonstrate the understanding of construction, operation and performance of synchronous generators and synchronous motor

ICT 220: Computer Architecture
Performance analysis and evaluation; limitations of scalar pipelines; superpipelined, superscalar and VLIW processing; parallelism in programs; memory and I/O systems; out-of-order execution; branch prediction; register and memory data flow techniques; Tomasulo’s algorithm; COTS hardware accelerators, CUDA, GPU programming architecture.

CEE 425: Signal Processing
This course provides a solid theoretical foundation for the analysis and processing of experimental data, and realtime experimental control methods. Topics covered include Discrete time (DT) signals; DT Linear Shift Invariant (LSI) systems; Fourier transforms; Fourier analysis for discrete time systems: DT Fourier series, DT Fourier transform, discrete Fourier transform, spectral leakage, frequency resolution, non-parametric spectral estimation. Digital filtering principles; Digital filter design; Statistical signal processing fundamentals; Practical signal processing skills in MATLAB; Applications example of digital signal processing: digital radio techniques, image compression.

CEE 430: Power Electronics
Introduction to power electronics and power electrical component, power rating and heat sinking components, Power semi-conductor devices, the concept of rectification, conversion, inversion and cyclo-conversion, filters. The role of power electronics and the main domains of application. Study and protection of Power semiconductor switches (power diode, power transistor, power thyristor, diac, triac, etc…) and implementation technique. Study of AC –X converters. Study of DC-X converters.

CEE 435: Electrical Power System
Students are expected to demonstrate the understanding of the principle of generation of electrical energy, and operation of power station. The student should also demonstrate the transmission and distribution of electrical energy. On completion of this course, the student should be able to understand the principles and methods of generation, transmission and distribution of electrical energy.

CEE 498: Research Project in Computer and Electrical Engineering
In this course the undergraduate honors research projects will be supervised by faculty members. This project should be sustaining and could be developed in a business venture. Each student will write an independent and innovative research work, which will be supervised by a faculty member. Each student will be expected to do an independent research work and write a project which will be supervised by a faculty member. It should be well noted that, at least 90% of this project will be done by the student involved and it must be unique and innovative.

CEE 450: Design Project
In this course a practical problem in an area of Computer and Electrical engineering is examined by the student and a concrete demonstration is made.

CEE 213: Computer and Electrical Engineering Lab I
Introduction to basic measurement equipment and techniques; use of circuit simulation tools; comparison to empirical performance of simple circuits using discrete devices and circuits; simple subsystem circuit design; introduction to automated data acquisition; and laboratory technical communication.

CEE 313: Computer and Electrical Engineering Laboratory II.
Prerequisites: CEE 213. Complex electronic circuit subsystem design, improving measurement system performance, impact of circuit parasitic, signal integrity, electromagnetic interference, thermal analysis, printed circuit board layout, and technical communication.

CEE 323: Computer and Electrical Engineering Laboratory III
CEE 413: Computer & Electrical Engineering Laboratory IV – Microcontroller laboratory
CEE 423: Computer and Electrical Laboratory V
CEE 433: Computer and Electrical Laboratory VI – Power systems and machines laboratory

CEE 233: Computer and Electrical Engineering Internship 1
Field visits to engineering companies will be carried out to expose students to practice all/some of the Computer and Electrical engineering skills learned.

CEE 333: Computer and Electrical Engineering Internship 2
Field visits to engineering companies will be carried out to expose students to practice all/some of the Computer and Electrical engineering skills learned.

SOFTWARE ENGINEERING

ICT 210: Discrete Mathematics
This course introduces the study of finite systems as an increasingly important concept in the computer age and a founding pillar in information technology. The digital computer is basically a finite structure, and many of its properties can be understood and interpreted within the frame work of Finite Mathematical Systems. The course covers formal mathematical objects like Sets, Graphs, Matrices, recurrence relations and examines how these objects arise in computer science- related problems.

ICT 215: Fundamentals of Information Technology
This course introduces students to the technologies that are fundamental in the gathering, processing, representation and storage of information. Based on the fact that students have been interacting with some of these technologies in their everyday activities, the course paints a formal picture of the concepts of Data, Information, Hardware (Input and Output), Software and Networks. Practical aspects will be on modern information representation technologies (HTML).

ICT 220: Computer Architecture
This course introduces the micro components that are interconnected for the functioning of a computer system. Very little emphasis is placed on the physics and electronics involved. The course covers the functioning of logic gates and combinational circuits and how they are used to implement Boolean functions which can be analyzed with truth tables and K-maps. Introductory notions in sequential circuits, timing diagrams and the design of registers and state diagrams are equally covered. Additional topics may include in a descriptive manner, the interconnections between combinational circuits (ALU, controllers, etc) sequential circuits (Registers, RAM, ROM, etc), Buses (data, address and control) and peripheral devices in a computer system. It equally introduces assembly programming using basic
commands only.

ICT 225: Information Systems
This course introduces the concepts of information systems as used in businesses and covers areas like definition, classification, components of a computer-based Information Systems, the place and role of Information Systems in various management structures and at various levels of management as well as analysis of IS. Introduction to database concepts are equally covered. Students will practice working with ISs and be able to perform simple create, read, update and delete operations on computer-based information systems.
Furthermore, this course teaches students how to design, construct, test, and debug databases using an Integrated Development Environment (IDE). Emphasis is on the design of databases that meet the needs of its users as well as the methodology used.

ICT 410: Network Security
The course covers theory and practice of computer security, focusing in particular on the security aspects of the web and Internet. It surveys cryptographic tools used to provide security, such as shared key encryption (DES, 3DES, RC4/5/6, etc.); public key encryption, key exchange, and digital signature (Diffie-Hellmann, RSA, DSS, etc.). It then reviews how these tools are utilized in the internet protocols and applications such as SSL/TLS, IPSEC, Kerberos, PGP, S/MIME, SET, and others (including wireless). System security issues, such as viruses, intrusion, and firewalls, will also be covered.

ICT 415: Data base management system
Database Management Systems will concentrate on the principles, design, implementation and applications of database management systems. The aim is to let students: understand the different issues involved in the design and implementation of a database system; To study the physical and logical database designs, database modeling, relational, hierarchical, and network models; To understand and use data manipulation language to query, update, and manage a database; To develop an understanding of essential DBMS concepts such as: database security, integrity, concurrency, distributed database, and intelligent database, Client/Server (Database Server), Data Warehousing; To design and build a simple database system and demonstrate competence with the fundamental tasks involved with modeling, designing, and implementing a DBMS.

ICT 420: Information and coding theory
This is intended to be a straightforward and accessible course on information theory. Information theory is the mathematical theory that deals with the fundamental aspects of communication systems. As such, its primary goal is not to deliver practical solutions to communications problems, but rather to answer the question whether encoding and decoding schemes exist or not for a given combination of a source model and a channel model. The two main outcomes of single-user information theory are that any source requires a minimum description rate to represent its output faithfully (source coding theorem) and that any channel is characterized by a maximum transmission rate above which the probability of error cannot be made arbitrarily small (channel coding theorem). The purpose of this course is to develop the fundamental ideas of information theory and to indicate where and how the theory can be applied.

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SWE 310: Computer programming 1
This course introduces students to the area of computer programming, taking into consideration the fact that this might be the first course on computer programming that the student is encountering in his / her educational career. Emphasis shall be placed on algorithmic thinking, algorithm representation and introduction to a specific programming language.

SWE 315: Introduction to Unix
This course covers UNIX file and operating system. It equally covers an understanding of multi-user and multitasking concepts. Editors, X-windows, Awk, email, Internet commands, shell commands and shell scriptsare also treated in this course. Projects, which provide practical experience, are completed as part of the homework requirements.

SWE 320: Object Oriented Programming
This course introduces students to the object oriented programming paradig and concepts such as classes, objects, methods, interfaces, packages, inheritance, encapsulation, and polymorphism. Emphasis is on the application of these concepts to practical problems. A prerequisite for this course will be a D+ in the Computer programming II course.

SWE 325: Web Technologies
This course covers the technologies that are involved in the representation of information on the web. Technologies such as Hyper Text Mark-up Language (HTML), Cascade Style Sheet (CSS), JavaScript for client-side scripting and a server-side scripting programming language such as PHP will be covered from a practical perspective.

SWE 330: Systems Programming
This course trains students on the issues involved in developing system-dependent applications. Topics such as file manipulations, working with vendor and third party programmers’ libraries (static and dynamic), programming for specific hardware, device driver and network programming are treated within this course. The course is project based.

SWE 335: Software Engineering
This course provides an academic backing to software engineering concepts which students would have exploited during the work experience course. The course delves into questions like: Why do so many software projects fail? What are the leading software development technical and management practices? What can be done to extract maximum value from technical reviews? Etc. It covers the traditional phases of software engineering such as: specification, requirement, design, implementation, verification and validation, documentation and packaging.

SWE 410: Mobile Device Programming
The course aims at giving students the tools to design and develop mobile apps, and publishes them online mobile application stores. It provides an introduction to mobile phone and tablet development in general, and a good understanding of the Android, the iOS or the windows platform in particular; and also the concept of hybrid apps. The diverse resource constrained hardware environments, the large number of software platforms, and quickly changing APIs are among the features that make mobile development challenging and rewarding. Therefore, topics such as file manipulations, interaction with programmable features of a mobile device, working with vendor and third party programmers’ libraries (static and dynamic) and interfacing with mobile device are treated within this course. The
course is project based.

SWE 498: Software engineering Research Project
In this course the undergraduate honors research projects will be supervised by faculty members. This project should be sustaining and could be developed in a business venture. Each student will write an independent and innovative research work, which will be supervised by a faculty member. Each student will be expected to do an independent research work and write a project which will be supervised by a faculty member. It should be well noted that, at least 90% of this project will be done by the student involved and it must be unique and innovative.

SWE 450: Software Engineering Design Project
Application for independent study approved by the instructor and the ICT Coordinator. Independent study or research under the direction of a full-time faculty member.

ICT 213: Operating Systems
This course covers the various generations of operating systems software as well as future trends in operating systems. It equally covers the boot process of a computer and the how the operating system executes its functions after boot-up. Students will practice how to install and exploit different operating systems (Disk partitioning and management of Software installations; System backup and recovery; Systems upgrade). This course is treated as a practical course.

SWE 313: Computer programming II
This course is a follow up of the computer programming I course. It deepens the student’s knowledge in computer programming through rigorous exercises / mini projects and covers topics like data types, data structures, programmer-defined data types, pointer, dynamic data structures and memory management from a programming perspective. A prerequisite for this course will be a D+ in computer programming I.

SWE 323: Programming in java
This course introduces computer programming using the JAVA programming language with object-oriented programming principles. Emphasis is placed on event-driven programming methods, including creating and manipulating objects, classes, and using object-oriented tools such as the class debugger.

SWE 413: Advanced Database management system
Advanced Database Management Systems course deals with the usage as well as concepts of design and architecture of databases. In covering the concepts, theorems, algorithms and proofs relevant to different aspects (design, architecture and implementation) are covered. The general approach is go through design, architecture (storage and indexes), core features (transactions, concurrency), and specialized database usage (data-mining, data-warehousing, distributed databases). The practical work done in the course goes through usage of some advanced SQL features and the implementation of some algorithms and coding of internals of an actual database
system.

SWE 423: Advanced Data Structures and Algorithms
This course provides a rigorous view into data structures and algorithms as used in computer programming. Though practical exercises, the course explores traditional and contemporary problems in data structures and algorithms, performance analysis as well as algorithm optimizations. Topics include search tree construction, tree balancing techniques, algorithms from graph theory and computational geometry, string matching algorithms, skip lists and hash tables, and techniques for parallel algorithms.

SWE 433: Entrepreneurial project

The Students will conceive and launch a software product or service using the principles of “Lean Startup”. The entrepreneurship project includes the development of a prototype and a business plan for a startup. Entrepreneurship projects are typically completed in teams of 2-4 students.

SWE 233: Software Engineering Internship 1
Field visits to Softwares companies will be carried out to expose students to practice all/some of the Software engineering skills learned.

SWE 333: Software Engineering Internship 2
Field visits to Softwares companies will be carried out to expose students to practice all/some of the Software engineering skills learned.

NETWORK AND TELECOM SYSTEM ENGINEERING

CNT 310: Computer Networks and Communication Technologies
This course covers the different layers of the OSI reference model and the TCP/IP model with emphasis on the role of each layer; describing transmission techniques, media and protocols associated to each layer as well as network topologies. Other topics such as Address classes and subnettingwill be introduced in this course. A prerequisite for this course will be a D+ in the introduction to information technology course.

CNT 315: Differential equations
The construction of mathematical models to address real-world problems has been one of the most important aspects of each of the branches of science. It is often the case that these mathematical models are formulated in terms of equations involving functions as well as their derivatives. Such equations are called differential equations. If only one independent variable is involved, often time, the equations are called ordinary differential equations. The course will demonstrate the usefulness of ordinary differential equations for modeling physical and other phenomena. Complementary mathematical approaches for their solution will be presented, including analytical methods. Topics may include: first order equations, mathematical models, linear equations of second order, the Laplace transform, linear systems of arbitrary order and matrices, nonlinear systems and phase plane analysis, numerical methods

CNT 320: Telecommunication Systems I
This course introduces students to the basic components of a telecommunication system covering topics such as Telecommunications networks and standards; Electrical signals, frequencies and modulation; analogue and digital transmissions; switch size and link capacity; queuing systems in telecommunications; digital networks and signaling techniques.

CNT 325: Telecommunication Systems II
This course is a continuation of the Telecommunication systems I course. It covers topics such as local and longdistance networks; Enterprise networks; concepts in transmission transport; CCITT signaling system No. 7; Voice over IP in packet Switched networks as well as community antenna television (Cable TV). A prerequisite of this course will be a D+ in the Telecommunications Systems I course.

CNT 330: Electric and magnetic fields theory
This course is design to teach students the effects of electric charges at rest and in motion. Both positive and negative charges produce force field which is called “electric field”. Moving charges produce current, which gives rise to another force field called “magnetic field”. The electromagnetic theory studies the behavior of the electric and magnetic fields.

CNT 410: Access Networks
This course covers the fundamentals structure and role of access networks within a telecommunication system. Emphasis is on the feeder and distribution layers of access networks, the structure and role in a telecommunication system. The course equally covers the various technologies (Wired and Wireless) available for providing connectivity to telecommunication networks from a descriptive and configuration standpoint.

CNT 415: Mobile Networks
This course provides an academic backing to mobile communications and wireless networks which students would have worked with during the work experience course. It presents the wireless and mobile network architectures, technologies and protocols. Topics covered include cellular and mobile IP concepts multiple-access methods, spread spectrum modulation, and different wireless network protocols such as WiFi, WiMAX and Bluetooth. It equally introduces the various wireless 1G, 2G, and 3G platforms, architecture, and protocols.

CNT 498: Research Project in Computer Network and Telecommunication Systems
In this course the undergraduate honors research projects will be supervised by faculty members. This project should be sustaining and could be developed in a business venture. Each student will write an independent and innovative research work, which will be supervised by a faculty member. Each student will be expected to do an independent research work and write a project which will be supervised by a faculty member. It should be well noted that, at least 90% of this project will be done by the student involved and it must be unique and innovative.

CNT 450: Design Project in Computer Network and Telecommunication Systems
Application for independent study approved by the instructor and the ICT Coordinator. Independent study or research under the direction of a full-time faculty member.

ICT 213: Operating Systems
This course covers the various generations of operating systems software as well as future trends in operating systems. It equally covers the boot process of a computer and the how the operating system executes its functions after boot-up. Students will practice how to install and exploit different operating systems (Disk partitioning and management of Software installations; System backup and recovery; Systems upgrade). This course is treated as a practical course.

CNT 313: Spectral Analysis of Signals
The course reviews classical and modern methods and algorithms for computer-based spectral analysis of signals. Also, it gives an overview of various applications in communications, systems engineering, radar, and biomedicine.

CNT 323: Transmission of information
This course offers an introduction to the quantitative theory of information and its applications to reliable, efficient communication systems. Topics include mathematical definition and properties of information, source coding theorem, lossless compression of data, optimal lossless coding, noisy communication channels, channel coding theorem, the source channel separation theorem, multiple access channels, broadcast channels, Gaussian noise, and time-varying channels.

CNT 413: Routing and Switching
This course introduces configuration routers and switches to build multiprotocol internetworks. OSI reference model, basic LAN and WAN design, dial access services, TCP/IP protocol suites, IP addressing, subnetting, static and dynamic routing, and WAN technologies such as HDLC, PPP, Frame Relay, ATM and ISDN.

CNT 423: Administering Network Infrastructure
Network infrastructure administration concepts and methods including installing, configuring and troubleshootingremote ac cess, remote access security, network protocols and monitoring.

CNT 433: Entrepreneurial project in Computer Network and Telecom Systems
The Students will conceive and launch a software product or service using the principles of “Lean Startup”. The entrepreneurship project includes the development of a prototype and a business plan for a startup. Entrepreneurship projects are typically completed in teams of 2-4 students.

CNT 233: Computer Network and Telecommunication Systems Internship 1
Field visits to Network companies will be carried out to expose students to practice all/some of the Software engineering skills learned.

CNT 333: Computer Network and Telecommunication Systems Internship 2
Field visits to Network companies will be carried out to expose students to practice all/some of the Software engineering skills learned. where and how the theory can be applied.

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