BACHELOR OF DIVINITY (BD)

Program Objective

This program aims at an understanding of humankind’s relationship with the Absolute (GOD) from a Christian Perspective. The program considers the Scripture (Old and New Testatments) as an important aspect of Divine relevation. The history and evolution of Christianity forms a crucial part of the study. Though moral issues are examined with a Christian Eye, other world religions like African Traditional Religion and Islam have not been neglected. Hence, the program intends to graduate students who are well grounded in Christian theology and how it relates with other world religions.

 

Career Prospects

Bachelor of Divinity is primarily a vocational degree that can be used for various personal, spiritual and vocational purposes. Hence the program qualifies you to work as a religious leader or minister in various Christian establishement. You can equally become a spiritual counselor and advocate for Christian Morality. Nevertheless, graduates are can be teachers in other theological schools.

 

Core Courses (32 Credits)

DIV 210: Introduction to Theology

DIV 220: Old Testament Scripture I

DIV 310: New Testament Scripture I

DIV 320: World Religions

DIV 330: Introduction to Canon Law

DIV 340: Dogmatic Theology

DIV 350: Moral Theology I (introduction, human acts and virtue)

DIV 360: Science and Religion

 

Course Descriptions

DIV 210: Introduction to Theology

The aim of this course is to expose students to the concept, object and method of theology as a science. It deals with the classification of theology and introduction of main divisions of theology into Scripture, dogma, morality and spirituality. It deals with sources of theology (Catholic and protestant). It highlights the role of Sacred Scripture, tradition and Magisterium in the development of Catholic theology as opposed to other theologies.

 

DIV 220: Old Testament Scripture I

The aim of this course is to introduce students to the composition and authorship of the Bible with particular stress on concepts of Bible, oral and written traditions, inspiration, canonicity, revelation, covenant and inerrancy would be explained. It also focuses on the introduction to the first five books (Pentateuchs) Genesis, Exodus, Leviticus, Numbers and Deuteronomy, and the historical books like Joshua, Judges, Tobit, 1 & 2 Maccabees, 1 & 2 Samuel and 1&2 Kings etc. It focuses on the message, principal characters and the events.

 

DIV 310: New Testament Scripture I

This course aims at introducing students to the Synoptic Gospels and John’s Gospel, the synoptic problem and different portrayals of Jesus. It focuses on the Gospels of Mark, Matthew and Luke based on the origin of Jesus, his ministry, teachings and his death and resurrection. It also focuses on Luke’s Acts of the Apostles and history of the early Church.

 

DIV 320: World Religions

This course examines the various religious beliefs and practices that underpin the major world religions including Judaism, Islam, Christianity, African Traditional Religion, Buddhism and Hinduism. It examines unifying as well as dissenting issues in the world major religions.

DIV 330: Introduction to Canon Law

This course introduces students the law of the church and how this law is implemented in order to handle spiritual and moral disputes in the church

 

DIV 340: Dogmatic Theology

This course examines the doctrinal teachings of the church and seeks to fight against heretical misconceptions and attacks from science, technology and paganism

 

DIV 350: Moral Theology I (introduction, human acts and virtue)

This course deals with the introduction to Moral theology under the themes of its scope, sources and highlights Christ as the source of all morality. It deals with moral theology and natural law, moral theology in the Old (torah) and New Testaments (beatitudes and Jesus’ attitudes to the Mosaic Law). It deals with human acts, impairments and modifiers and the concept and divisions of virtue.

 

DIV 360: Science and Religion

This course examines the dichotomy and rivalry that have existed between science and religion in a bid for a search for unifying factors. It seeks to establish scientific innovations in terms of medicine and technology as complimentary to religion and sees religious doctrines as the moral conscience in science and technology.

 

 

Concentration Courses (32 credits)

Students are expected to take 8 of the following courses

DIV 370: Old Testament Scripture II

DIV 375: New Testament Scripture II

DIV 380: History of Christianity I (General Church History)

DIV 410: History of Christianity II (Africa)

DIV 415: Moral Theology II (Conscience, Obedience to Authority and Sexuality)

DIV 420: Biblical Theology I (Creation and Eschatology)

DIV 425: Biblical Theology II (Christology)

DIV 430: Biblical Theology III (Pauline and Johanine)

DIV 435: Spirituality of Select Saints

DIV 440: Churches Living Tradition

DIV 445: Introduction to African Traditional Religion

DIV 450: Introduction to Islam

DIV 455: Liberation Theology

DIV 460: Inter-Religious Dialogue & Ecumenism

 

 

DIV 370: Old Testament Scripture II

This course aims at exposing the students to wisdom and prophetic literature. These will include wisdom books like Job, Psalms, Proverbs, Ecclesiastes (Quoheleth), Ecclesiaticus (Sirach) and prophetical books like Isaiah, Jeremiah, Ezekiel, Hosea, Amos, Joel (major) and Jonah, Haggai, Micah, Obadiah. Zechariah, Malachi, Habakkuk (minor prophets). The study will focus on false and true prophets, their messages, themes and famous passages of the above.

 

DIV 375: New Testament Scripture II

This course deals with the introduction to the letter to the Hebrews, 13 Pauline letters (Romans, 1 & 2 Thessalonians, 1 & 2 Corinthians, Ephesians, Galatians, Colossians, Philippians and pastoral letters; 1 & 2 Timothy, Titus, Philemon, and other letters to the Christians (James, John, Peter) and the Book of Revelation. It shall highlight the date of composition, authorship, structure, style and outline of the letters and book of Apocalypse.

 

DIV 380: History of Christianity I (General Church History)

This course deals with the history of Christianity from the first century with topics like the birth of the Church on Pentecost day, early Church beginnings and the first Christian community. It highlights how Christianity rooted itself in the Roman Empire despite opposition and the relationship between the Church and the State. It also deals with the Lutheran Reformation and Counter Reformation and the rise of Pentecostalism in Christendom.

 

DIV 410: History of Christianity II (Africa)

This course exposes students to the history of the Church and missionary activities in of Africans to foreign ways of worshipping God and the confusion between missionary activity and colonialism.

 

DIV 415: Moral Theology II (Conscience, Obedience to Authority and Sexuality)

This module deals with the notion of human conscience, its formation and obedience to the moral law and authority. It deals with the concept of obedience, responsible use of authority, respect for human life and health and the understanding of our sexuality and the notion responsible acquisition of property and attitude to common good.

 

DIV 420: Biblical Theology I (Creation and Eschatology)

This course enables students know the concepts of creation (origin) and eschatology (end-times). It looks at the Genesis creation where God is creator and original sin, creation ‘ex-nihilo’ and various theories of creation (Darwin’s theory of evolution), the fall of man, the problem of evil and man’s restoration (salvation). It also deals with the last four things namely death, judgment, (purgatory?) hell and heaven. It also highlights the second coming of Christ (parousia), general judgment, end of the world and the general resurrection of the dead.

 

DIV 425: Biblical Theology II (Christology)

The aim of this course is to highlight the person of Christ (Christology) as revealed by the Gospels and what Christ says about himself in the gospels of Mark, Matthew, Luke and John and other epistles. This course presents Jesus Christ as the central figure of Christianity, the incarnate Son of God, and divinely conceived by the Blessed Virgin Mary. It traces the Greek rendering of the Hebrew name Joshua (Yahweh is deliverance) and the Greek word Christ (anointed one) or Messiah. It highlights his annunciation, birth, life, death, resurrection, ascension and his return in glory during the second coming (parousia).

 

DIV 430: Biblical Theology III (Pauline and Johanine)

The aim of this course is to expose students to the Pauline corpus and Johanine theologies as exposed in the books attributed to them in the Bible like the thirteen letters of St Paul, the Gospel of John, 3 letters of John and the Book of Apocalypse. In the first place, it deals with authorship and pseudonimity of Pauline letters and the purpose and theological message of each Pauline letter and the communities and authors to whom he addressed them. Secondly, this course focuses on the differences between Johanine and Sypnotic Gospels, the themes, signs, symbolism, theology, Jesus’ identity (I am) and the spirituality of John.

DIV 435: Spirituality of Select Saints

This course highlights the life of select saints that are of great relevance to contemporary issues and they are studied from a moral and spiritual perspective in order to illumine the lives of others.

 

DIV 440: Churches Living Tradition

The course examines the apostolic succession and tradition of the church as handed down from one generation to the next as an important aspect of the churches doctrinal knowledge besides the Bible and Revelation.

 

DIV 445: Introduction to African Traditional Religion

The aim of this course is to expose students to the origin, meaning and peculiarities (polytheistic?) of ATR and misleading conceptions by foreign theorists. It focuses on the different concepts, nature and attributes of God, the hierarchy of beings in Africa and means of intercession. It treats the role of rituals of birth, marriage, death in the daily lives and the impact of metaphysical forces of magic, witchcraft and sorcery in the lives of Africans.

 

DIV 450: Introduction to Islam

This course deals with the meaning, origin and major beliefs of Islam as a monotheistic Abrahamic religion. It highlights the special place of the Prophet Muhammad and the Qur’an in the lives of Muslims. It presents the relationship and differences between the Qur’an the Christain Bibles and the five pillars of Islam namely the profession of faith (shahada), prayer (salat), almsgiving (zakat), fasting (sawm), and pilgrimage (hajj). It poses the problem whether Islam is the religion of peace or violence.

 

DIV 455: Liberation Theology

This course presents Jesus as the liberator (John 10:10) of the Jewish people from the bondage of sin and Roman rule. It shall focus on the role played by Peter and Paul to liberation the Jewish people from false teachers and traditions. It shall focus on South American concept of liberation theology (cf. Oscar Romero).

 

DIV 460: Inter-Religious Dialogue & Ecumenism

The aim of the course is to trace the similarities between world religions (Christianity, Islam, Hinduism, Buddhism and ATR) and see what positive aspects of these religions can facilitate dialogue between them. The Christian Church champions the course of inter-religious dialogue since many people do not yet know Christ or his Gospel, but look to various religions for answers about good and evil, the origins of man and his ultimate fate. The course would highlights the importance of mutual understanding, safeguard and foster social justice, moral values, peace and freedom among world religions (NostateAetate, n.3). This course seeks to explain the concept of ecumenism and demonstrate the different approaches by many Christian churchestowards unity as Christ wished that “they may all be one (John 17). It highlights the 20th century efforts towards greater cooperation and reconciliation between Christian churches like the Protestant (Presbyterian, Baptist, Anglican), Roman Catholic and the Orthodox. It traces the role of the Catholic Church in the ecumenical movement and looks at important themes in the ecumenical dialogue. It addresses the fact that there is no ecumenical dialogue between the mainstream churches and Pentecostal denominations.

 

In addition to the concentration courses, students are expected to do the following courses

DIV 480: Entrepreneurial Project    (4)

DIV 493: Theology Internship (8)

DIV 498: Theology Research Project    (4)

 

DIV 480: Entrepreneurial Project

This entails a practical project written by the student. The project should have practical plans on how a business can be established and sustained in Theology. This is geared towards self-employment

 

DIV 493: Theology Internship

There will be a full-time involvement and report on any observation and practice of various religious activitiveis in any selected and accredited religious establishment.

 

DIV 498: Theology Research Project   

A program of study on an approved research topic in Philosophy will be followed up by a supervisor. This supervised individual study provides an opportunity for in-depth reading and research on a topic selected by the student and supervisor. Students in this program of study may carry out a pilot project in preparation for a thesis or dissertation. Students are expected to select a researchable problem in theology and carry out a study on it. This project should follow the American Psychological Association Format.

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